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English 327
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Romantic Resources
Connections: Contexts

Syllabus

Thursday, August 29th

First day: introductions, course overview.

Tuesday, September 3rd

Reading
All documents in Appendix F of your edition of Letters Written in France and the first two (Price and Burke) from Appendix G.

Assignment
Group I Response: This assignment will kick off the proves of readings political and fictional texts as intertwined parts of a large conversation among Romantic-era writers. Discuss the political texts assigned for today in literary terms: What metaphors do they employ? How do they characterize their intended audience? What characters do they introduce, and how do they direct our feelings about those characters?

Thursday, September 5th

Reading
All remaining documents in Appendix G of Letters Written in France and all of Appendix B of Caleb Williams.

Assignment
Group II Response: Write on the same response topic that Group I tackled for Tuesday, continuing the conversation that Group I helped us begin.

Tuesday, September 10th

Reading
Helen Maria Williams, Letters Written in France, 63-128.

Assignment
Group III Response: Once again, we see here a piece of non-fiction prose employing a number of novelistic techniques. How do Williams's literary devices help us understand her place relative to the other writers we have read? You can write about an assortment of points or choose to focus on a developing theme such as theatricality, sentiment, etc.

Thursday, September 12th

Reading
Williams, Letters Written in France, 129-190.

Assignment
Group IV Response: As the situation in France develops and ultimately changes in dramatic ways, how does Williams transform her rhetoric to account for new situations?

Tuesday, September 17th

Reading
For this class we take the first small step towards the research paper. Each of you will select one of the texts on reserve for the class and submit an annotation for your chosen text. In class, we will discuss the texts in turn.

Assignment
The annotations are the assignment.

Thursday, September 19th

Reading
William Godwin, Caleb Williams, Volume I (59-175).

Assignment
Group I Response: open response.

Tuesday, September 24th

Reading
Godwin, Caleb Williams, 179-350.

Assignment
Group II Response: open response.

Thursday, September 26th

Reading
Godwin, Caleb Williams, 351-443 (including the alternate ending).

Assignment
Group III Response: open response.

Tuesday, October 1st

Reading
Marilyn Butler, "Godwin, Burke, and Caleb Williams," Essays in Criticism 32 (1982): 237-57. On reserve.

Gary Handwerk, "Of Caleb's Guilt and Godwin's Truth: Ideology and Ethics in Caleb Williams." ELH 60:4 (1993): 939-960. Online at muse.jhu.edu/demo/elh/60.4handwerk.html.

Assignment
Group IV Response: Discuss the two articles in a way that leads you to mention at least one point in each article you found persuasive and at least one question that each article leads you to ask.

Thursday, October 3rd

Reading
Robert Bage, Hermsprong, 57-110.

Assignment
Group I Response: Use your response to propose one or more issues that arise in this opening section that you would like us to follow as the novel develops. Make a case for the particular interest of the emphasis you choose.

Tuesday, October 8th

Reading
Bage, Hermsprong, 110-199.

Assignment
Group II Response: Follow up on one of Group I's responses for Thursday or on one of the topics we subsequently raised in class. What has this section of the novel done to transform or develop our earlier sense of one if its aspects?

Thursday, October 10th

Reading
Bage, Hermsprong, 199-256.

Assignment
Group III Response: Look back at your classmates' initial responses to the first sections of the novel. What has Bage done at this point to complicate the novel's development or to surprise you with new rhetoric?

Tuesday, October 15th

Reading
Bage, Hermsprong, 256-339.

Assignment
Group IV Response: open response.

Thursday, October 17th

Reading
All appendices to Hermsprong.

Assignment
Group I response: open response.

FIRST PAPER DUE BEFORE FALL BREAK

No Classes Oct 21-25

Tuesday, October 29th

Reading
Charles Brockden Brown, Ormond, 37-115.

Assignment
Group II Response: open response.

Thursday, October 31st

Reading
Brown, Ormond, 115-169.

Assignment
Group III Response: open response.

Tuesday, November 5th Library Day. Details will follow.

Thursday, November 7th

Reading
Brown, Ormond, 169-276.

Assignment
Group IV Response: open response.

PAPER PROSPECTUS DUE MONDAY, APRIL 11

Tuesday, November 12th

Reading
Julia Stern, "A Lady Who Sheds No Tears: Liberty, Contagion, and the Demise of Fraternity in Ormond." In The Plight of Feeling: Sympathy and Dissent in the Early American Novel. On reserve.

Assignment
Group I Response: open response.

Thursday, November 14th

Reading
Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, Frankenstein, Volume I.

Assignment
Group II Response: open response.

Tuesday, November 19th

Reading
Shelley, Frankenstein, Volume II.

Assignment
Group III Response: open response.

Thursday, November 21st

Reading
Shelley, Frankenstein, Volume III.

Assignment
Group IV Response: open response.

ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY DUE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 25

Tuesday, November 26th

Reading
Appendices B, C, and D of your edition of Frankenstein.

Assignment
Group I Response: open response.

No class November 28th

Tuesday, December 3rd

Reading
George Gordon, Lord Byron. All anthology excerpts from Don Juan. Note that the anthology contains three parts of the poem in different places, starting on pages 489, 599, and 640.

Assignment
Group II Response: open response.

Thursday, December 5th

Reading
Byron, Manfred (in the anthology).

Assignment
Group III Response: open response.

PROGRESS REPORT ON PAPER DUE MONDAY, DECEMBER 9

Tuesday, December 10th

Reading
Percy Bysshe Shelley. Anthology excerpts from Prometheus Unbound.

Assignment
Group IV Response: open response.

Thursday, December 12th

Last day: wrapping up, smashing the class piņata.

FINAL PAPER DUE WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 18 AT 5:00