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Sounds in Poetry
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Alliteration and assonance separate out the components of rhyme to describe less exact sonic links between words. Alliteration is the repetition of a consonant sound, while assonance is the repetition of a vowel sound. Here's some alliteration of "w" sounds from an Early Modern ballad:




There lived a wife at Usher's Well,

  And a wealthy wife was she;



The Rape of the Lock line "He watched the ideas rising in her mind" uses assonance to link its "i" sounds.

The basic forms of rhyme and echo that these pages have described form only the tip of poetry's aural iceberg. To learn more about sounds, echoes, and rhymes in poetry, see (for instance) the fourth chapter of Western Wind: An Introduction to Poetry (by John Frederick Nims and David Mason) or Alfred Corn's chapter on "The Phonic Echo" in The Poem's Heartbeat.

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