Rail yard background, from the Library of Congress

Connections

A Hypertext Resource for Literature

back one section Section back one page Page    Page 11.2.3    Page forward one page Section forward one section

Romanticism


Monday, February 18

  • "The Romantics and Their Contemporaries" (anthology 2)

  • William Wordsworth, "The Solitary Reaper" (anthology 533)

    • To see a sampling of recent critical work on Romanticism indexed by topic, you can look at the Romantic Circles Praxis series.

In class today, I will give a broad introduction to Romanticism and explain how the texts we will read fit into the big picture. I will leave time for questions about the reading, so prepare one or two of those in advance.


Tuesday, February 19

PAPER DUE FOR STUDENTS WRITING PAPERS;
SUBMIT UNDER MY OFFICE DOOR BY 3:00


Wednesday, February 20

  • William Wordsworth, Preface (anthology 408), "The Thorn" (anthology 394), and "Note to the Thorn" (anthology 400) from Lyrical Ballads (1798 and 1800)

  • The ballad section of Connections

Linking passage exercise: group 2


Friday, February 22

  • Wordsworth, "Lines Written a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey" (404) and "Old Man Travelling" (403) from Lyrical Ballads (1798)

  • The blank verse section of Connections

Linking passage exercise: Group 3


Monday, February 25

  • Samuel Taylor Coleridge, "The Eolian Harp" from Poems on Various Subjects (1796, anthology 572) and "Kubla Khan" (1798/1816, anthology 614)

  • Edward Said, from Orientalism (handout)

Linking passage exercise: Group 4


Wednesday, February 27

  • Coleridge, "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner," from the 1798 version (anthology 578) and full 1817 version (anthology 580)

Linging passage exercise: Group 5


Friday, February 29

  • Coleridge, "This Lime-Tree Bower My Prison" (1800, anthology 574)

Discussion day: Seminar B meets in the regular classroom, with group 5 doing responses. Seminar A (groups 1, 2, and 3) does responses and meets in small groups, led by group member #2.


Monday, March 3

  • George Gordon, Lord Byron, The Giaour (1813, in Three Oriental Tales textbook)

  • Marilyn Butler, "The Orientalism of Byron's Giaour" (in Three Oriental Tales)

    • Dictionary of Literary Biography (Grinnell only): Byron as poet

    • The Life and Work of Lord Byron on englishhistory.net provides good basic information. Aside from that site, there is remarkably little useful online material about Byron.

Linging passage exercise: Group 6
Wednesday, March 5

  • Byron, Dedication (1819, anthology 728), Canto I (1819, anthology 732) and excerpt from Canto II (1819, anthology 779) of Don Juan

Linging passage exercise: Group 1


Friday, March 7

  • Byron, Cantos VII and VIII of Don Juan (1822, handout)

Discussion day: Seminar A meets in the regular classroom, with group 3 doing responses. Seminar B (groups 4, 5, and 6) does responses and meets in small groups, led by group member #3.


Monday, March 10 through Friday, March 14

NO CLASS THIS WEEK

READ PRIDE AND PREJUDICE
AT THE PACE YOU CHOOSE TO BE READY
TO DISCUSS THE NOVEL AFTER SPRING BREAK

  • Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice (1813)

    • Check out the almost terrifyingly detailed P&P page of pemberley.com.


SPRING BREAK


Monday, March 31
  • Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Because we will not have met for a while at this point, I will lecture a little more than usual at the beginning of class to relocate our discussion. Come to class having read the novel carefully and formulated some written remarks or questions about it.


Wednesday, April 2

  • Percy Bysshe Shelley, from A Defence of Poetry (1821, anthology 867), "Ozymandias" (1818, anthology 823), and "Ode to the West Wind" (1819, anthology 835).

    • Dictionary of Literary Biography (subscription only): Shelley as poet and prose writer

    • The Keats-Shelley House is a good starting point for finding the digital Shelley. None of the amateur sites online can capture Shelley as well as his own words in Stuart Curran's e-text of the notes to Queen Mab.

Linging passage exercise: Group 2


Friday, April 4

  • Shelley, "To a Sky-Lark" (1820, anthology 837) and John Keats, "Ode to a Nightingale" (1817, anthology 953)

    • You can see the manuscript version of Keats's poem, with some commentary, here.

Discussion day: Seminar B meets in the regular classroom, with group 6 doing responses. Seminar A (groups 1, 2, and 3) does responses and meets in small groups, led by group member #3.


Monday, April 7

  • John Keats, "On First Looking into Chapman's Homer" (1816, anthology 924), with companion readings, and "Ode on a Grecian Urn" (1819, anthology 955)

Linking passage exercise: Group 3


Tuesday, April 8

PAPER PROSPECTUS DUE
FOR STUDENTS WRITING PAPERS;
PAPER DUE TUESDAY, APRIL 15


Wednesday, April 9

EXAM IN CLASS
FOR STUDENTS TAKING THE EXAM OPTION

back one section Section back one page Page    Page 11.2.3    Page forward one page Section forward one section