Rail yard background, from the Library of Congress

Connections

A Hypertext Resource for Literature

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Syllabus

Friday, August 29

First day: Introductions and course outline


Monday, September 1

  • James Joyce, "Araby" (from Dubliners)
  • Read the fiction section of Connections, following external links if and when you want to. Come to class prepared to apply the reading to a story.

Also, please go to the class discussion board and write a solid paragraph introducing yourself to the class. Aside from the obvious introductory function of this assignment, it also ensures that we flush out any technical problems before moving farther into the term.

Bring your copy of Dubliners to class. In class, we will read "Araby" together and apply the Connections material to the reading.


Wednesday, September 3

  • Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights, Introduction and opening, 3-37

Group 1 response: Choose two short passages from the novel that are at least 10 pages apart in the reading. In your response, quote both passages and then write about how the two of them interact with each other.

Note: here and throughout this syllabus, the first (less indented) reading or link is required, while the second (more indented) reading or link is supplemental and optional. Here, for example, the reading from Wuthering Heights is required, whereas exploring the website is optional.


Friday, September 5

  • Wuthering Heights, 37-80

Group 2 response: Choose two short passages from the novel that are at least 10 pages apart in the reading. In your response, quote both passages and then write about how the two of them interact with each other.


Monday, September 8

  • Wuthering Heights, 80-138

  • Robert Dale Parker, "New Criticism," from How to Interpret Literature

We will discuss New Criticism in class.

Group 3 response: Using a short quotation from the Parker chapter as a starting point, write a post about some specific element of Wuthering Heights in light of New Criticism. What would a New Critical approach help you see in the text, and what would it obscure?


Wednesday, September 10

  • Wuthering Heights, 138-208

Group 4 response: Choose two short passages from the novel that are at least 10 pages apart in the reading. In your response, quote both passages and then write about how the two of them interact with each other.


Friday, September 12

  • Wuthering Heights, 208-288

In class today, we will construct a list of key issues to follow as we read criticism of the novel.

Group 5 response: Choose two short passages from the novel that are at least 10 pages apart in the reading. In your response, quote both passages and then write about how the two of them interact with each other.


Monday, September 15

  • Wuthering Heights criticism, 333-347

Assignment for everyone: do the reading of the history of criticism and send me an email containing two items: first, a specific point in the readings you would like to talk or ask about in today's discussion; and second, your preliminary sense of what you might end up writing a paper about. This assignment is for reflective purposes; we will not yet meet about your topics, and they may change or develop as we do the critical readings. I just want you to go through a preliminary phase of considering topics.


Wednesday, September 17

Come to class with a draft thesis for your paper. We will do an in-class exercise about thesis construction, at the end of which you will reflect on your own draft thesis.


Friday, September 19

  • Parker, "Historicism and Cultural Studies"

  • Susan Meyer, "Your Father Was Emperor of China, and Your Mother an Indian Queen", in the Bedford edition

Everyone: Note that the paper prospectus is due Monday.

Group 1 response: Discuss a point in the article that you consider especially instructive or, on the contrary, to be a misreading of Wuthering Heights. You can talk about more general applications of the day's theory if you like, but every response should start by discussing a specific moment in the day's article.


Monday, September 22

  • Parker, "Marxism"

  • Terry Eagleton, "Myths of Power: A Marxist Study on Wuthering Heights," pp. 394-410 of the Bedford edition
  • FICTION ANALYSIS PAPER PROSPECTUS DUE IN CLASS

Group 2 response: Discuss a point in the article that you consider especially instructive or, on the contrary, to be a misreading of Wuthering Heights. You can talk about more general applications of the day's theory if you like, but every response should start by discussing a specific moment in the day's article.


Wednesday, September 24

  • Joyce, "The Boarding House" and "A Painful Case" from Dubliners

  • James Wood, from How Fiction Works on narration and realism
    • Dictionary of Literary Biography (subscription only): Joyce as novelist and short-fiction writer

    • The Modern World, which produces excellent author pages, has an extensive one devoted to Joyce.

    • Edward J. Maloney and David F. Fanning of Ohio State maintain the James Joyce Resource Center, with a bibliography of books, a timeline, and "casebooks" of references to Joyce scholarship grouped by critical approach.

Group 3 response: open response connecting Wood's ideas to one or both of the Joyce stories.


Friday, September 26

NO CLASS TODAY. Work on your papers.


Monday, September 29

Group 4 response: Write a response based on the close reading handout. In the response, talk about how you are applying the methods described in the handout.


Wednesday, October 1

  • Jones, "Marie"

Group 5 response: Write a response based on the close reading handout. In the response, talk about how you are applying the methods described in the handout.


Thursday, October 2

FICTION ANALYSIS PAPER DUE:
PRINTED COPY OUTSIDE MY OFFICE DOOR BY 4:00


Friday, October 3
  • Read the sonnet and scansion sections of Connections and make notes that will prepare you to analyze the technique of sonnets in class. (These two sections are also available on Pweb as printable PDFs.) If you have not recently thought about the lines and feet of English poetic meter, the terms section will provide useful background information.

Come to class prepared to answer questions about the readings and apply them to a sonnet.


Monday, October 6

  • Joseph Williams, from Style (PWeb)

We will contine talking about the sonnet today and then apply Williams's principles in a writing exercise.


Wednesday, October 8

Come to class prepared to apply the readings to "My Last Duchess."


Friday, October 10

  • Read the blank verse section of Connections and make notes that will prepare you to analyze the technique of blank verse in class. This reading is also on Pweb as a printable PDF.

  • Parker, "Queer Studies"

  • Robert Frost, "Mending Wall"

  • Modern American Poetry, on "Mending Wall"

You will meet in your response groups today (group 1, group 2, etc.), either in our classroom or at another location of your choice. You will spend your 50 minutes discussing the four readings for the day, and by the end of the session, the member of your group whose last name has the most letters will post to the discussion board a report, which will include 1) the members of your group who were present at the discussion, 2) two short comments about how "Mending Wall" fits into the traditions of blank verse, and 3) two short comments capturing how your group applied the Parker or Modern American Poetry readings to the poem.


Monday, October 13

Group 1 response: open response using the manifesto from the first link and one of the poems.


Wednesday, October 15
  • Revision Guidelines (Pweb)

We will have a revision workshop in class today. Prepare a printout that includes a) two complete paragraphs from the current version of your first paper and b) three points or questions that you are focusing on in your revision. Bring four copies of this sheet to class.


Friday, October 17

Group 2 response: discuss Bergvall's poem in the context of free verse. Consider especially the differences among the ways of encountering Bergvall's poem in the assigned readings.


FALL BREAK

Monday, October 27

Group 3 response: open response. Our discussion may focus mainly on "American Sonnet" and its relation to our earlier discussions of sonnets.

Note that the paper prospectus is due Wednesday.


Wednesday, October 29

POETRY PAPER PROSPECTUS DUE IN CLASS

  • Joyce Kilmer, "Trees," with Brooks and Warren's commentary (Pweb)

  • Jerome McGann on "Trees" (Pweb)

  • Alan Bigelow, "This Is Not a Poem"

  • Michael Magee, "A Rhetoric of Examples #7" (Pweb)

Group 4 response: Write a response comparing any two ways of looking at Kilmer's "Trees" represented in today's readings.


Friday, October 31

Come to class with one written note of perhaps 20-30 words about how you think computers and digital methods might change how people read and analyze literary texts. Be ready to explain how your note relates to the Hayles essay. In class, we will look at some tools for manipulating digital texts.


Monday, November 3

  • Research day! We will talk about the annotated bibliography assignment and related resources.

Come to class with some preliminary ideas about the kinds of things you might research for your fiction or poetry paper.


Wednesday, November 5
  • Complete the Treasure Hunt of the MIND (handout) and bring your findings to ARH 124 (as usual) for class.

Library day!


Thursday, November 6

POETRY PAPER DUE
UNDER MY OFFICE DOOR
by 3:00.


Friday, November 7

  • Timothy Corrigan, A Short Guide to Writing about Film, Chapter 2

Come to class prepared to apply the Corrigan chapter to a film scene.


Monday, November 10

  • Orson Welles, Citizen Kane (1941)

  • Corrigan, Short Guide, chapter 3

    • The standard resource: IMDB's page

    • Filmsite.org's page on the film has a lot of interesting information, especially about the Kane-Hearst parallel.

    • Roger Ebert's very good viewer's guide

    • Reviews from MRQE

Come to class prepared to apply chapter 3 to the boarding house scene from Citizen Kane, according to the topics and groups outlined in the document I have sent you.


Wednesday, November 12

We will continue talking about Citizen Kane today.

Group 5 response: Write a response about any part of the film other than the boarding house scene based on Corrigan's guidance (chapter two or chapter three) about watching films.


Friday, November 14

  • Alfred Hitchcock, Vertigo (1958)

Group 1 response: Write a response based on Corrigan's guidance about watching films.


Monday, November 17

  • Leland Poague, "Engendering Vertigo"

  • Parker, "Feminism"

Group 2 response: discuss a specific moment or scene in the film that you read differently after reading the texts for today.


Wednesday, November 19

Writing day: we will do an in-class exercise on transitions and organization.


Friday, November 21

PEER REVIEW OF SKELETON PAPERS: Bring to class FOUR COPIES of a current version of one of your papers that removes the body paragraphs except for the first sentence of each one. Your version should have a title, first paragraph, transition sentences, last paragraph, and Works Cited list. In class, you will share this skeletal paper with a group and work through a set of questions to evaluate it.


Monday, November 24

FILM ANALYSIS PAPER PROSPECTUS DUE IN CLASS

  • John Huston, The Maltese Falcon (1941)

  • Paul Schrader, "Notes on Film Noir"

Group 3 response: Write a response based on any element of the film that you would not experience by reading a transcription of the film's spoken words.


Wednesday, November 26

Class will not meet today. We will devote class time to individual conferences about your prospectuses and the end of the semester.


Monday, December 1

  • Bryan Singer, The Usual Suspects (1995)

Group 4 response: Refer back to our discussions of The Maltese Falcon to comment on what The Usual Suspects does and does not have in common with the Film Noir tradition.


Tuesday, December 2

FILM ANALYSIS PAPER DUE
OUTSIDE MY OFFICE DOOR BY 4:00


Wednesday, December 3

  • J. P. Telotte, "Rounding up 'The Usual Suspects': The Comforts of Character and Neo-Noir"

Group 5 response: open response.


Friday, December 5

MOCK WORKSHOP OF ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ENTRIES: I will provide some annotated bibliography entries for you to evaluate as a way of solidifying expectations for this assignment.


Monday, December 8

PEER REVIEW OF RESEARCH PRODUCTS: Bring to class FOUR COPIES of a) two full entries for your annotated bibliography and b) two paragraphs taken from current versions of your papers in which you quote an external source.


Wednesday, December 10

PEER REVIEW OF SKELETON PAPERS: Bring to class FOUR COPIES of a current version of one of your papers that removes the body paragraphs except for the first sentence of each one. Your version should have a title, first paragraph, transition sentences, last paragraph, and Works Cited list. In class, you will share this skeletal paper with a group and work through a set of questions to evaluate it.


Friday, December 12

  • Last day of class: wrapping up, questions about the final portfolio.


Tuesday, December 16

FINAL PORTFOLIO DUE BY 5:00 P.M.
OUTSIDE MY OFFICE DOOR

Note: anyone taking the extension for the portfolio by the normal procedure will have a deadline of 5:00 p.m. on Thursday.

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